accustom


accustom
01. It'll take Sophie a while to [accustom] herself to her new life in the university dormitory.
02. Since getting married, Liane has had to get [accustomed] to her husband's busy work schedule.
03. I'm not really [accustomed] to getting up so early on the weekends. At home I could sleep in until noon.
04. The hardest thing for our students to get [accustomed] to with their host families is the food.
05. Many people think they can become [accustomed] to long periods of little sleep without any consequences, but it is not true.
06. My son did his chores with [unaccustomed] enthusiasm after I told him I would pay him $5 an hour.
07. It took Marco about a year to become [accustomed] to our cold winters.
08. During a certain stage of culture shock, people are often afraid that they will never become [accustomed] to the new culture.
09. Our cat is [unaccustomed] to going outside, so she always runs upstairs when we open the front door.
10. Helen Rowland once suggested that a man can become so [accustomed] to the thought of his own faults that he will begin to cherish them as charming little personal characteristics.
11. A Mexican proverb states that he who is [accustomed] to evil is offended by good.
12. Once you become [accustomed] to the heat, you will be able enjoy the life here.
13. It always takes people time to [accustom] themselves to changes in their routine.
14. We are not [accustomed] to being treated so rudely. In my country, people would never make us wait like this.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Accustom — Ac*cus tom, v. i. 1. To be wont. [Obs.] Carew. [1913 Webster] 2. To cohabit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] We with the best men accustom openly; you with the basest commit private adulteries. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accustom — index discipline (train), inure (accustom), naturalize (acclimate), reconcile Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • accustom — ► VERB 1) (accustom to) make used to. 2) (be accustomed to) be used to. ORIGIN Old French acostumer, from costume custom …   English terms dictionary

  • Accustom — Ac*cus tom, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accustomed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accustoming}.] [OF. acostumer, acustumer, F. accoutumer; [ a] (L. ad) + OF. costume, F. coutume, custom. See {Custom}.] To make familiar by use; to habituate, familiarize, or inure;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Accustom — Ac*cus tom, n. Custom. [Obs.] Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accustom — (v.) early 15c., from O.Fr. acostumer (12c., Mod.Fr. accoutumer), from à to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + costume (see COSTUME (Cf. costume) (n.)). Related: Accustomed; accustoming …   Etymology dictionary

  • accustom — *habituate, addict, inure Analogous words: *adapt, accommodate, adjust: *harden, season, acclimatize Antonyms: disaccustom Contrasted words: alienate, wean, *estrange …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • accustom — [v] get used to acclimatize, acculturate, acquaint, adapt, familiarize, habituate, season; concepts 35,202 …   New thesaurus

  • accustom — [ə kus′təm] vt. [ME accustomen < OFr acostumer < a , to + costume: see CUSTOM] to make familiar by custom, habit, or use; habituate (to) …   English World dictionary

  • accustom — v. (d; refl., tr.) to accustom to (we had to accustom ourselves to the new working conditions; more usu. is: we had to get accustomed to the new working conditions) * * * [ə kʌstəm] (d;refl.,tr.) to accustom to (we had to accustom ourselves to… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • accustom — UK [əˈkʌstəm] / US verb Word forms accustom : present tense I/you/we/they accustom he/she/it accustoms present participle accustoming past tense accustomed past participle accustomed formal accustom yourself to something …   English dictionary